02.03.2012

Measure at the Old Fire Station.

Measure is currently working at the Old Fire Station on Leswin Road in Stoke Newington, London. Our plan is to restore the disused spaces within the building ready to rent out as studios or offices and to relaunch the main hall as an event space for the local community and independent event promoters.

Old Fire Station has been a community center for the local Stoke Newington area since 1982. The building has provided spaces for many groups over the years, currently it has two permanent tenants; the Fire Station Nursery and Growing Communities who grow and distribute locally grown produce and have run the farmers market since 2003.

We aim to invite local community groups and businesses to collaborate on events and workshops creating a vibrant, engaging destination for N16.

If you’d like more information on the studios and the main hall space please email us at:

info@measure.org.uk

UPDATE 19/04/12: We have two studios to rent at the Old Fire Station and the 2nd floor hall is available for hire as yoga, Tai Chi, dance studio or alternative therapy rooms, amongst other possible uses. 

Please email us at info@measure.org.uk for more information and to arrange a visit.
19.01.2012

Thor McIntyre Burnie and Chris Watson: The Ghost Roost on Radio 4

Thor McIntyre Burnie and Chris Watson’s ‘A Pier at Wilton’s’ shown in  Measure’s 2005 show Me and My Shadow was nothing short of revelatory. The music hall and Brighton’s great West Pier were built with in a few years of each other and in 2005 both buildings were in a transitory stage and in need of some love and attention. Thor and Chris’s three, 10 minute compositions made from the sounds of thousands of starlings flying in and out of the ball room, were transposed to the main hall of Wilton’s Music Hall. The empty building was filled with the intense rush as the birds appeared to enter the hall falling to a silent stillness in seconds as they roosted.

The fate of the two buildings separated soon after, as the West Pier burnt into the sea and Wilton’s was revitalised by director Frances Mayhew and her dedicated team and continues to be one of the most beautiful venues in London.

Over ten years ago before the West Pier in Brighton was destroyed by storms and fire, wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson and sound designer Thor McIntyre Burnie were given permission to rig up microphones in what had once been the grand concert hall. During the day, the pier was a dangerous place to venture, but on a winter’s night, as dusk fell, and the sea glowed red, it was transformed into a magical scene as tens of thousands of starlings gathered in the air above, performing their aerial acrobatics (murmurations) before descending onto the pier to roost for the night. The starlings roosted in what remained of the concert hall, and it was the sounds of these birds gathered in their night roost, which Chris and Thor wanted to capture – from dusk until dawn, when the birds departed once again on their feeding trips.

It was no easy task rigging up the concert hall with microphones. “When the wind blew” Chris said, “chunks literally fell off and were tossed into the sea like autumn leaves”. They rigged up an array of different microphones as they wanted to capture both the sense of space; the atmosphere of the concert hall, as well as close up sounds of the birds themselves. As dusk approached the first birds arrived over the pier. In time, they descended into the concert hall, and an extraordinary performance began; the sounds of tens of thousands of performers gathered together. Today the West Pier no longer exists except for some skeletal fragments. The starlings have passed into history, but what’s left are the recordings. They are the recordings of a Ghost Roost.

Listen to The Ghost Roost on the Radio 4 website here.

Listen here to ‘A Pier at Wilton’s’ recorded at Wilton’s Music Hall during Me and My Shadow in May 2005.

Over ten years ago before the West Pier in Brighton was destroyed by storms and fire, wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson and sound designer Thor McIntyre Burnie were given permission to rig up microphones in what had once been the grand concert hall.
18.01.2012

Cathie Pilkington: The Value of the Paw

14 January – 7 May 2012
V&A Museum of Childhood

An exhibition bringing together a selection of work from the last 10 years by the contemporary British sculptor Cathie Pilkington inspired by the Museum’s collections, the artist has borrowed ideas and memories from many of the toys on display to assist her own three dimensional cast of strange creatures and well-known characters from popular fairy tales.

Works featured include Little Red Riding Hood, The Wonderful Story of the Tar Baby (both 2011) and Singerie (2004).

Private View Tea Party: Saturday, 21 January 15:30 – 17:30pm

V&A Museum of Childhood
Cambridge Heath Road
London E2 9PA

www.museumofchildhood.org.uk

14 January - 7 May 2012 
V&A Museum of Childhood

A selection of sculptures by Cathie Pilkington created over the last 10 years, inspired by her ideas and memories of works in the V & A Museum of Childhood.
29.11.2011

Anomaly Island, Harriet Murray

Campbell Works, 27 Belfast Road, London, N16 6UN.
25th November – 11th December 2011
Film and discussion evening: 7th December 2011 7.30pm

As the smoke of smouldering cinders from this summer’s riots lingers in the air we hear the sound of raked seating being unbolted from the The Lord Mayors Parade. Against this backdrop with all its gilded pomp and lollipop glory neatly screening the fledgling feathers of the protest camp at St Paul’s, Harriet Murray installs her new exhibition Anomaly Island.

Conjuring multiple references through an English history from Daniel Defoe to Nick Clegg, Anomaly Island draws us to uneasy shores. Murray’s new installation raises questions by the handful and unloads them at our feet.

Personal psychology and thought are individual outcrops surrounded by oceans. We are islands of neuro-linguistic flowerings, electro-chemical broth, where life choices must be negotiated through a maze of ‘nurture’ neurons, ‘nature’ quarks and daily bombardment by symbols of corporatized power and culture.

Life goes on, we go to work, we butter the toast, but what happens when our compliance barometer begins to beep and we recalibrate our assumptions and shred old expectations?

Murray’s new work explores the complex relationships between, the known self and the revealed self, between first world comforts and the desire to escape its suffocation, our need for community and our longing for peace, solitude and time to reflect. Making a home, is at the heart of what it is to be human, making a shelter is a matter of survival. For what is a bird without a nest?

Teetering on an edge between a glamorous glance to an idealized existence and a very human struggle of survival, Anomaly Island presents us with three distinctive artworks brought together at Campbell Works. An ‘Englishman’s castle’ made from patriotic vegetable boxes filled with a lifetime of memorabilia, a ghostly raft that offers to transport us through the veil, and an elegiac video of perennial calm. “et domus sua cuique est tutissimum refugium [and each man’s home is his safest refuge].”

Click here for more infomation.

As the smoke of smouldering cinders from this summer’s riots lingers in the air we hear the sound of raked seating being unbolted from the The Lord Mayors Parade. Against this backdrop with all its gilded pomp and lollipop glory neatly screening the fledgling feathers of the protest camp at St Paul’s, Harriet Murray installs her new exhibition Anomaly Island.
28.11.2011

Fontsmith include FS Conrad font in 10 year celebration

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the launch of their typeface library, Fontsmith has published a limited edition box-set of booklets. Each booklet details a short story written by our typeface designers, giving an intimate insight into the creative processes and the team dynamic within the Fontsmith studio. The box-set is the centre-piece of a campaign celebrating 10 Years in Type and was designed by Thompson Brand Partners.

Jason Smith set up Fontsmith in 1999, initially working on corporate identities. Over the next few years, the agency designed a series of typefaces, released in 2001 as the Fontsmith Library. Since then, the company has not looked back and now employs five staff and has a long list of cool clients like UEFA Champions League, Channel 4, BBC and Telefonica for whom it produces bespoke type. The Fontsmith Library currently has 23 typefaces and includes modern greats such as FS Lola, FS Me, FS Albert, FS Sally and FS Joey.

Fontsmith were invited to create a font for the exhibition Chord in 2009. Measure wished to extend the creative process to all aspects of the exhibition, and a bespoke font for an exhibition was a long held ambition of ours. After a visit to the artists studio and discussions with Measure, Phil Garnham from Fontsmith created several treatments utilising themes from the construction of the work which were then worked into the final design.

More infomation here.

Fontsmith were invited to create a font for the exhibition Chord in 2009. Measure wished to extend the creative process to all aspects of the exhibition, and a bespoke font for an exhibition was a long held ambition of ours. After a visit to the artists studio and discussions with Measure, Phil Garnham from Fontsmith created several treatments utilising themes from the construction of the work which were then worked into the final design.

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the launch of their typeface library, Fontsmith has published a limited edition box-set of booklets. Each booklet details a short story written by our typeface designers, giving an intimate insight into the creative processes and the team dynamic within the Fontsmith studio.

Jason Smith set up Fontsmith in 1999. The Fontsmith Library now  has 23 typefaces and includes modern greats such as FS Lola, FS Me, FS Albert, FS Sally and FS Joey.
11.10.2011

Two Years at Sea, Ben Rivers at the BFI

Screenings as part of the 55th BFI London Film Festival.
21:00 on Friday 21st October, 13:30 on Monday 24th October at NFT1.

To book tickets please visit: http://www.bfi.org.uk/lff/node/1830

A delicate and witty portrait of Jake, an outsider who lives in the wilderness of his own creation.

Using old 16mm cameras, artist Ben Rivers, who has been nominated for the Jarman Prize and has won a Tiger Award at Rotterdam, creates work from stories of real people, often those who have disconnected from the normal world and taken themselves into wilderness territories.

His new long-form work extends his relationship with Jake, a man first encountered in his short film This Is My Land. The title refers to the work Jake did in order to finance his chosen state of existence. He lives alone in a ramshackle house, in the middle of the forest. It’s full of curiosities from a bygone age, including a beloved old gramophone. We see his daily life across the seasons, as he occupies himself going for walks in all weathers, and taking naps in the misty fields and woods. Endlessly resourceful, he builds a raft to fish in a loch. Jake has a tremendous sense of purpose, however eccentric his behaviour seems to us. The presence of the camera is irrelevant to him; he has no desire for human contact, and is completely at home in his environment, the nature around him and his constructed abode.

Rivers’ gracefully-constructed film creates an intimate connection with an individual who would otherwise be a complete outsider to us.

Helen de Witt

Screenings as part of the 55th BFI London Film Festival.
21:00 on Friday 21st October, 13:30 on Monday 24th October at NFT1.

A delicate and witty portrait of Jake, an outsider who lives in the wilderness of his own creation.

Using old 16mm cameras, artist Ben Rivers, who has been nominated for the Jarman Prize and has won a Tiger Award at Rotterdam, creates work from stories of real people, often those who have disconnected from the normal world and taken themselves into wilderness territories.

His new long-form work extends his relationship with Jake, a man first encountered in his short film This Is My Land. The title refers to the work Jake did in order to finance his chosen state of existence. He lives alone in a ramshackle house, in the middle of the forest.
11.10.2011

Des Hughes at the Frieze Sculpture Park 2011

Measure has just finished assisting Des Hughes make and install his three large scale versions of the Angry Pins work from the ‘Thems’ series of sculptures. Measure worked with Des on the recent show ‘Thems Please’  at 76 Chatsworth Road in Hackney. More details on that show here.

The Sculpture Park at Frieze Art Fair is located in the beautiful surroundings of the English Garden. It is within a three-minute walk of the main fair site and exhibits new works by both established and emerging artists represented by Frieze Art Fair exhibitors. This year, curator David Thorp once again selected the Sculpture Park. Entry to the Sculpture Park is free to the public.

David Thorp, selector of the Sculpture Park at Frieze Art Fair commented, ‘This year’s Sculpture Park continues to provide a fascinating cross section of sculpture being made today from the monumental to the socially engaged. The twelve works on display by established and emerging artists build on a dialogue begun in previous years, developing a debate about art in public places and the condition of sculpture as an evolving conversation that proceeds by example, as an exchange of ideas between artists and artworks.’

This year the following artists will be exhibiting in the Sculpture Park:
Neha Choksi
Johan Creten
Claudia Fontes
Alicia Framis
Tom Friedman
Gimhongsok
Des Hughes
Thomas Houseago
Eva Koťátková & Petr Koťátko
Will Ryman
Kiki Smith
Gavin Turk

Measure has just finished assisting Des Hughes make and install his three large scale versions of the Angry Pins at the Frieze Art Fair Sculpture Garden. The Sculpture Park at Frieze Art Fair is located in the beautiful surroundings of the English Garden showing new works by both established and emerging artists represented by Frieze Art Fair exhibitors.
09.10.2011

The Miracle Methods Series, Frances Scott

THE MIRACLE METHODS SERIES: A Luminous Reader by Frances Scott will be presented as an episode as part of the Lucky PDF broadcast programme with Frieze Projects 2011. www.friezefoundation.org/commissions/detail/luckypdf/

Listeners can tune in online for the live broadcast, 4 – 5 pm on 15 October at www.luckyPDF.com

The narrator is here to show and instruct on the use of misdirection and diversion, as aids in concealing the modus operandi of the feat, the vital sleight or subtlety employed. The narrator becomes part of a composite image, where the spaces in which he appears slide across each other like shuffling a pack of cards.

THE MIRACLE METHODS SERIES: A Luminous Reader by Frances Scott will be presented as an episode as part of the Lucky PDF broadcast programme with Frieze Projects 2011. www.friezefoundation.org/commissions/detail/luckypdf/ Listeners […]
06.10.2011

House Guests, Liane Lang

6th – 22nd October 2011

Open 12-6pm Thurs, Fri and Sat (other days open by appointment only)
30 Queensdown Rd
London E5 8NN

WW Gallery is pleased to present House Guests, a new installation by Liane Lang.

This new work takes its cue from the preserved or recreated living or working spaces of famous figures, designed to allow the viewer to enter temporarily into the past – a museum to the individual life. The projected film is an animation made in Rudyard Kipling’s Vermont house, the site of many traumatic events for his family but also where he wrote many of his best-loved books. The haunting atmosphere of the film gently spills over into the exhibition space, where strange objects, piles of books, pieces of furniture and photographs extend the narrative.

The film animation was made at Naulakha, the house of Rudyard Kipling in Vermont, an isolated building in the Connecticut River Valley. Kipling built this house to his own designs and lived here with his wife and daughters. The space we see is haunted, occupied by inhabitants that appear and vanish, furniture that moves of its own accord and disembodied voices that play in the overgrown swimming pool. In the exhibition space, found objects are arranged like haunted souls along the walls, hinting at the dark side of Kipling’s times and thoughts, the confusion and conflict of colonialism, travel and friendship as well as racism and arrogance, a boy’s adventure tale and the horrors of war.

www.wilsonwilliamsgallery.com

WW Gallery is pleased to present House Guests, a new installation by Liane Lang. 

This new work takes its cue from the preserved or recreated living or working spaces of famous figures, designed to allow the viewer to enter temporarily into the past – a museum to the individual life.
13.09.2011

Makeshift Monuments by Diane Bielik at The Old Hungarian Club

An Impressions Gallery off-site project.

An exhibition of photographs made during the run up to the closure of the Hungarian club in Bradford, which shut its doors in the summer of 2010 due to diminishing membership. Diane Bielik’s father, Attila, is Hungarian and was an active member of the club for many years. The news of its closure was the impetus to begin photographing the club as there was a desire to ‘capture’ this place before it was gone. The photographs will be incorporated onto the walls and the viewers will need to move through the rooms of the disused social club to see the exhibition.

Diane will be giving an artists talk in the club on Sunday 16th October, please see the weblinks below for more details.

The Old Hungarian Club, 4 Walmer Villas, Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD8 7ET.

Friday 30th September until Sunday 30th October. Friday to Sunday 12pm to 5pm free entry.
Private view is October 2nd at 2pm

www.dianebielik.co.uk

www.impressions-gallery.com

 

Measure toured the exhibition On Overgrown Paths by Ben Rivers to the Impressions Gallery in 2010. Click here to read more info.

An exhibition of photographs made during the run up to the closure of the Hungarian club in Bradford. Diane Bielik's father, Attila, is Hungarian and was an active member of the club for many years. The news of its closure was the impetus to begin photographing the club as there was a desire to 'capture' this place before it was gone.